Friday, May 13, 2016

Last days to get my parenting ebooks on sale!



Hobo Mama wants you to know she's a professional blogger! Look at how professional she's being!

A gentle reminder that the deep discount on my three parenting ebooks is coming to a close. The countdown is on!

Right now they're at these prices:


On May 16, they'll revert to their list prices, so save now while you can!

I'll include a summary and reviews below so you can learn what people think of them!

Wednesday, May 11, 2016

Homeschooling in the everyday

Hobo Mama wants you to know she's a professional blogger! Look at how professional she's being!

Here are more of our unschooling adventures,
as chronicled in instamoments.

For ideas for everyday learning,
be sure to check out
What Will We Learn Today?,
my homeschool ideabook,
on sale this week only!







Taking flight at the @imaginechildrensmuseum! #imaginechildrensmuseum #childrensmuseum #4yearsold #4years

A photo posted by Pirate Family Fun & Learning (@piratefamilyfun) on







My lil' kicker. ⚽ #soccerstar #soccerclass #lilkickers #arenasports #soccer #4years

A photo posted by Pirate Family Fun & Learning (@piratefamilyfun) on



A whole book of #pokemon at the #library! Woot! #bookworm #booklove #librarylove #books #unschooling #homeschooling #homeschool #8years

A photo posted by Pirate Family Fun & Learning (@piratefamilyfun) on






Here's where to find the card game!

Monday, May 9, 2016

Get my parenting ebooks for only 99 cents each — hurry!



Hobo Mama wants you to know she's a professional blogger! Look at how professional she's being!

I've enrolled all my parenting ebooks into a special promotion at Amazon called Kindle Countdown Deals. Starting today, each one is available starting at only $0.99 for a limited time. You can see the time left on the countdown timer. For the next week, each will gradually rise back to list price, so grab them at a discounted price while you can!

Here's where to find them:

Run, run, run, and get the discounted prices! Unless you want to learn more about each of them first — in which case, read on.

Wednesday, May 4, 2016

Spring days at the beach

Hobo Mama wants you to know she's a professional blogger! Look at how professional she's being!

Our springy adventures!

#springhassprung!

A photo posted by Pirate Family Fun & Learning (@piratefamilyfun) on





Daring the sea. #waves #tide #pugetsound #4yearsold #4years #naturekids #barbaricyawp

A photo posted by Pirate Family Fun & Learning (@piratefamilyfun) on



Guess who's SO BIG he has to walk everywhere now! #16months

A photo posted by Pirate Family Fun & Learning (@piratefamilyfun) on



Friday, April 22, 2016

Teaching your children not to cooperate with law enforcement

Hobo Mama wants you to know she's a professional blogger! Look at how professional she's being!

This article is written from a U.S. perspective with regards to matters of law. I welcome other perspectives in the comments.


Did you see Making a Murderer, about a man who's been convicted AGAIN of a crime he possibly did not commit? We don't have to go into my opinions of Steven Avery's guilt or innocence — I just want to talk about what seems to me to be a classic case of extorting a false confession out of his 16-year-old nephew, Brendan Dassey, and my fear that my children could one day be accused, arrested, tried, and convicted simply because I haven't told them this important piece of advice:

Don't talk to the police.

Brendon is a minor when this murder investigation goes down. He is repeatedly interviewed without a parent present. He has a low I.Q. In short, he is vulnerable, and the cops take advantage of this.

Despite no physical evidence whatsoever, and no prior run-ins with the law by Brendan, they decide he's guilty and then systematically, over many excruciating hours, manipulate and lie to Brendan to coerce him into saying what they want. I don't really want to "prove" here that I'm right — this is just my opinion, after having seen comparable interrogation footage of other false confessions of similarly vulnerable people. You can watch the footage yourself and form your own opinion.

Whether this particular confession was false, my point is just this: People DO give false confessions, and innocent people DO go to prison, and I definitely don't want that to happen to my kids!

But how do you balance the messages you want to give young kids about law enforcement with the warnings you want to instill in older children? How do I tell my four-year-old, "Police officers are our friends! They help us!" — and then turn around and tell my eight-year-old, "If the police want to talk to you, you say NOTHING but 'I want to talk with my parents'"?

Wednesday, April 13, 2016

The golden hour at Gas Works Park

Sam and the boys went to Gas Works Park in Seattle
and then to a neighboring playground,
at just the right time on a spring evening.